Friday, April 29, 2011

Buster Keaton, absurd behind bars


I'm currently involved in a scintillating argument with the Powers that Be, trying to prove that an erroneous statement on an important document that says "mild retardation" should actually say "severe retardation" and thus be shuffled onto another pile altogether, the pile that warrants a bit more help, some protective supervision is what it's called and might be the cause, the reason for the extra help to prevent the sort of fall that causes bloody noses, bruised and bumped. Said argument entails numerous telephone conversations and back and forths, the requesting of letters and papers with official stamps, the clock keeps ticking eighteen months, the choice between acceptance of mild and wanting severe making my heart shrink, grow cold and a layer of bars.

16 comments:

  1. onward, soldier. i am crossing my fingers you get what you need.

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  2. I send you hugs. I can't imagine that system there. Doesn't a doctor simply write what the diagnosis is, and that's taken as good enough?

    Healing thoughts to your heavy heart xo

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  3. This is NOT a fight a mother should ever have to fight.
    I love you.

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  4. They're not just labels, but they ARE in fact labels.

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  5. I can only imagine how difficult that statement must be for you to have to change and the gyrations for getting it changed must be like rubbing salt into a wound. And, as a little humor, William Faulkner has nothing on me for long sentences!!

    Best,
    Bonnie

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  6. "the choice between acceptance of mild and wanting severe making my heart shrink, grow cold and a layer of bars."

    what shouldn't be, is. and that stinks. but also, sometimes, the what is, is still so valuable, valued, and beautiful. like a mother's love for her beautiful, yet disabled, daughter. like the daughter, herself. no matter what the labels need to say to get her the help she needs.

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  7. How come seizure disorder and difficulties with motor planning don't suffice? With a photo of the poor bruised nose?

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  8. God, it's so hard. Blowing the wind at your back as hard as I can. Love.

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  9. Get on out from behind those bars, the bars of bureaucracy. One day you will be free, I hope. I hope so much for you Elizabeth.

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  10. A - Protective supervision is not related to seizures and/or medical disorders. In fact, that works against it. Protective supervision is for children/adults whose cognitive disability is such that they can endanger themselves without 24-hour supervision. As you know that would be Sophie, but evidently there's a lot of rigmarole to "proving it."

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  11. How awful, thinking of you xo

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  12. courage !
    http://whatisbelgium.blogspot.com

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  13. I hope for fairness for you and for Sophie. And for her best care too .....

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